d2LifePhotography: Blog https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog en-us (C) d2LifePhotography d2lifephotography@gmail.com (d2LifePhotography) Tue, 20 Oct 2020 14:32:00 GMT Tue, 20 Oct 2020 14:32:00 GMT https://www.d2lifephotography.com/img/s/v-12/u413812380-o884552183-50.jpg d2LifePhotography: Blog https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog 115 120 How To Be Natural With Portrait Photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/how-to-be-natural-with-portrait-photography The problem with portrait photography is coming out with a portrait that has the subject either uneasy looking, stiff, nervous, or is just plain discomfited with their awkward smiles prominently displayed in the photo. 

A photographer should crack their subject's openness up so they would lighten up and cooperate with you. They'd be more natural too and so easy to work with. It would result to portraits that are not just lovely but lively with the subject's true essence captured in the image. 

So, how does one crack up the code to make their subject work their way up towards having the most natural self and so you begin taking their portrait shots in the easiest and most natural manner too? Here are four tips:

Tip #1
Work on the subject's hands. Well, not that you will take different shots of their hands. Instead, give something which they can hold to. Keep their hands busy so that they have cognitive distraction and therefore can curb any camera anxiety they are suffering. That will make for a good shot because it will appear the most natural when the portrait show the entire image with the subject's hands busy doing something.

Tip #2
Always use a chair. A chair can be the handiest tool you can have while taking their portrait shots. It is always a proven trick to make the subject sit and find them more comfortable and natural than when they stand. There is more a casual thing in the air in which you can take advantage of and do your different angles taking pictures of them. 

Tip #3
Learn the art of attracting the distraction. Sounds confused, yes? But here is the idea: get the subject distracted by letting them talk about something which they are interested in, maybe about their favorite pets, family, hobbies, and just about anything that you know will make them soften and open up. Out of these distractions, make good laughs out of it. 

This is called shifting techniques that easily loosen up the subject and create the mood that you want when you want to begin shooting up. Not only will you have a lighter, more casual work tandem but you can use them up to have shots with a general sense of fun and light aura, making that up for more natural and sweeter photos. 

Tip #4
Do remember to always bring with you respect for everybody you work with. No matter how old your clients are, it is always a good thing to pass on respect to everybody. Whether you are doing personal portrait photography works with your own family, the children or your spouse, or with clients who hired you, respect will clear the atmosphere up and will bring good natured photo sessions. 

For instance, if the subject is exuding discomfort during the shoot, it is best to bring them on a location where you can secure privacy. Also, don't just drop and move if you have something in your mind. Be outright and tell your ideas, and have conversation with them to ensure they are open with what you are trying to impose on the shoot. 

In portrait photography, all four tips above are essential if you do want to make your subject or clients more at ease in front of your camera and to bring results that have the most natural effect in them. Make sure then to bring with you these tips to a more effective and productive photographer in you. 
 

 

]]>
d2lifephotography@gmail.com (d2LifePhotography) camera fayetteville fayetteville photography photography portrait portrait photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/how-to-be-natural-with-portrait-photography Tue, 20 Oct 2020 14:32:02 GMT
Capturing Great Landscape Photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/capturing-great-landscape-photography Wide angle lenses are best suited for landscape pictures. A great landscape view for a picture depends largely on the amount of light falling on its location. 

Action, Lights and Location

After selecting the location which you feel will enable you to capture a great picture, evaluate the amount of light available in the area. If this is for an important picture, make the effort to consider the effects of light at different times over the course of 24 hours and decide during which part of the day the light will be most beneficial.

Once you have done this, you can then determine which features or additional components added to your camera foreground will help to produce a more enhanced effect and depth for the picture. Don't discount the possibility of using other nearby areas as well for an even better shot. Sometimes the greatest landscape backgrounds are available in locations you might not ordinarily consider. You might also try taking pictures from different angles to weigh their impact on the snapshots, positive or negative.

To avoid any shadows or darkness appearing over the picture as you take the shot, it is best to capture a view early in the morning or in the latter portion of the afternoon.

Once you have determined the time of the day to shoot, set up your camera using a tripod. After all, you don't want a shaking hand to diminish the beauty you are attempting to capture. Also, use a light meter to gauge the amount of light, and adjust the aperture and shutter speed accordingly.

Using Natural Effects

You can always add parts of nature in your pictures to help produce a very different, though natural, effect on your picture. For example, sunset moments can be best captured when the sun is touching the horizon. Take the picture about five minutes after this point. It is also advisable to take the picture from as high a position as you can find. And you can also make use of a polarizing filter to highlight sky color and tone. Making use of these techniques can produce an effect similar to a postcard.

Equip Yourself with Necessary Supplies

Normally, to capture a landscape view a photographer will likely need to travel out of the confines of city life. However, any time you travel some distance to take photos, bring extra personal and photography supplies, such as a water bottle, flash light, additional rolls of film, etc. You definitely do not want to migrate several miles from home only to discover you have neglected to bring a sufficient supply of anything you will need!

Finally, determining which lens is best suited for snapping a particular view is really a matter of experience, skill, and taste. Mastering landscape photography is not a difficult task but requires practice, interest, and skill development. Locating that jaw-dropping view and then capturing the right shot takes both persistence and patience - traits of which many frustrated photographers fall short. 

If you are not able to capture that stunning landscape photograph the first or second time, don't give up.  The landscape isn't going anywhere.


 

 

]]>
d2lifephotography@gmail.com (d2LifePhotography) camera landscape landscape photography photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/capturing-great-landscape-photography Tue, 20 Oct 2020 14:27:36 GMT
A Brief History Of Photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/a-brief-history-of-photography For centuries images have been projected onto surfaces. The camera obscura and the camera lucida were used by artists to trace scenes as early as the 16th century. These early cameras did not fix an image in time; they only projected what passed through an opening in the wall of a darkened room onto a surface. In effect, the entire room was turned into a large pinhole camera. Indeed, the phrase camera obscura literally means "darkened room," and it is after these darkened rooms that all modern cameras have been named.

The first photograph is considered to be an image produced in 1826 by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce on a polished pewter plate covered with a petroleum derivative called bitumen of Judea. It was produced with a camera, and required an eight hour exposure in bright sunshine. However this process turned out to be a dead end and Niépce began experimenting with silver compounds based on a Johann Heinrich Schultz discovery in 1724 that a silver and chalk mixture darkens when exposed to light.

Niépce, in Chalon-sur-Saône, and the artist Louis Daguerre, in Paris, refined the existing silver process in a partnership. In 1833 Niépce died of a stroke, leaving his notes to Daguerre. While he had no scientific background, Daguerre made two pivotal contributions to the process.

He discovered that by exposing the silver first to iodine vapour, before exposure to light, and then to mercury fumes after the photograph was taken, a latent image could be formed and made visible. By then bathing the plate in a salt bath the image could be fixed.

In 1839 Daguerre announced that he had invented a process using silver on a copper plate called the Daguerreotype. A similar process is still used today for Polaroids. The French government bought the patent and immediately made it public domain.

Across the English Channel, William Fox Talbot had earlier discovered another means to fix a silver process image but had kept it secret. After reading about Daguerre's invention Talbot refined his process, so that it might be fast enough to take photographs of people as Daguerre had done and by 1840 he had invented the calotype process.

He coated paper sheets with silver chloride to create an intermediate negative image. Unlike a daguerreotype a calotype negative could be used to reproduce positive prints, like most chemical films do today. Talbot patented this process which greatly limited its adoption.

He spent the rest of his life in lawsuits defending the patent until he gave up on photography altogether. But later this process was refined by George Eastman and is today the basic technology used by chemical film cameras. Hippolyte Bayard also developed a method of photography but delayed announcing it, and so was not recognized as its inventor.

In the darkroomIn 1851 Frederick Scott Archer invented the collodion process. It was the process used by Lewis Carroll.

Slovene Janez Puhar invented the technical procedure for making photographs on glass in 1841. The invention was recognized on July 17th 1852 in Paris by the Académie Nationale Agricole, Manufacturière et Commerciale.

The Daguerreotype proved popular in responding to the demand for portraiture emerging from the middle classes during the Industrial Revolution. This demand, that could not be met in volume and in cost by oil painting, may well have been the push for the development of photography.

However daguerreotypes, while beautiful, were fragile and difficult to copy. A single photograph taken in a portrait studio could cost US$1000 in 2006 dollars. Photographers also encouraged chemists to refine the process of making many copies cheaply, which eventually led them back to Talbot's process. Ultimately, the modern photographic process came about from a series of refinements and improvements in the first 20 years.

In 1884 George Eastman, of Rochester, New York, developed dry gel on paper, or film, to replace the photographic plate so that a photographer no longer needed to carry boxes of plates and toxic chemicals around. In July of 1888 Eastman's Kodak camera went on the market with the slogan "You press the button, we do the rest". Now anyone could take a photograph and leave the complex parts of the process to others. Photography became available for the mass-market in 1901 with the introduction of Kodak Brownie.

Since then color film has become standard, as well as automatic focus and automatic exposure. Digital recording of images is becoming increasingly common, as digital cameras allow instant previews on LCD screens and the resolution of top of the range models has exceeded high quality 35mm film while lower resolution models have become affordable. For the enthusiast photographer processing black and white film, little has changed since the introduction of the 35mm film Leica camera in 1925.


 

 

]]>
d2lifephotography@gmail.com (d2LifePhotography) dark rooms history of photography images photography photos https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/a-brief-history-of-photography Tue, 20 Oct 2020 14:25:48 GMT
Black And White Digital Photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/black-and-white-digital-photography There are several ways to achieve black and white digital photography. With black and white digital photography, you are bringing the end user back into a period of time when life seemed a lot simpler. Many digital cameras come equipped with a function to take these types of photos. If your digital camera does not support this function, you can still change your photographs into black and white with software programs.

You’ll want your black and white digital photography to look its best when you are finished. A technique that can help you get the best image out of your digital photograph is through image manipulation. You may find it better to convert your eight-bit color images (which are usually jpegs) into 16-bit colors first. This is important because an 8-bit RGB can be the same as a 10-bit grayscale.

You can find information all over on the Internet to help you with your black and white digital photography. These resources can be found in everything from websites to magazines. Colored pictures can look truly beautiful as a black and white display. You will usually have to convert your graphics, because although there are options with digital cameras, there are no true black and white digital cameras.

Correct the Colorcasts

An important part of black and white digital photography is correcting the colorcasts. These are caused by bad lighting, but you can use software such as PhotoShop Elements to make the relevant changes by using their editing applications. The Imaging Factory is also software that can help you to easily convert and fix lighting areas in your graphics to get the best look with your black and white digital photography. If you want to turn your graphics into black and white digital photography, you can step into a completely new dimension in photography. You can do an endless array of projects right from your own computer.


 

 

]]>
d2lifephotography@gmail.com (d2LifePhotography) black and white blacknwhite bnw digital photography https://www.d2lifephotography.com/blog/2020/10/black-and-white-digital-photography Tue, 20 Oct 2020 14:23:19 GMT